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Hydnophora grandis

Gardiner, 1904

Colonies are composed of irregular branches, mostly circular in section, with little tendency to form an encrusting base. Branches are 10-15 millimetres thick. There is little fusion of monticules.

Colour: Cream, yellowish or green.

Habitat: Shallow reef environments.

Abundance: Usually uncommon.

Similar species: Hydnophora rigida

Taxonomic note: Source reference: Veron (2000). Taxonomic reference: Chevalier (1975).

Map displaying probable distribution of species. Points indicate recorded sightings from OBIS.
Hydnophora grandis.  Philippines.  H. grandis (top left) and H. rigida (bottom) are distinct if seen together underwater.  Charlie Veron.

Hydnophora grandis. Philippines. H. grandis (top left) and H. rigida (bottom) are distinct if seen together underwater. Charlie Veron.

Hydnophora grandis.  Papua New Guinea.  A large colony of anastomosed branches.  Jim Maragos.

Hydnophora grandis. Papua New Guinea. A large colony of anastomosed branches. Jim Maragos.

Hydnophora grandis.  Papua New Guinea.  A small clump showing some tendency to form an encrusting base.  Charlie Veron.

Hydnophora grandis. Papua New Guinea. A small clump showing some tendency to form an encrusting base. Charlie Veron.

Hydnophora grandis.  Palau.  Detail of branches.  Gustav Paulay.

Hydnophora grandis. Palau. Detail of branches. Gustav Paulay.

Hydnophora grandis.  Philippines.  Showing monticules.

Hydnophora grandis. Philippines. Showing monticules.

Hydnophora grandis.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing branching pattern.

Hydnophora grandis. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing branching pattern.

Hydnophora grandis.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing skeletal detail.

Hydnophora grandis. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing skeletal detail.

Hydnophora grandis.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing skeletal detail.

Hydnophora grandis. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing skeletal detail.