Skip to Content
Sign up
Report an error

Favia favus

(Forskål, 1775)

Colonies are massive, rounded or flat. Corallites are conical. Septa are slightly irregular and widely spaced. Paliform lobes are poorly developed.

Colour: A wide variety, often mottled, with pale calices.

Habitat: May be a dominant species on reef back margins.

Abundance: Common.

Similar species: Favia danae , Favia rosaria

Taxonomic note: Source reference: Veron (2000). Taxonomic references: Scheer and Pillai (1974), Veron, Pichon and Wijsman-Best (1977). Additional identification guides: Veron (1986), Sheppard and Sheppard (1991), Nishihira and Veron (1995).

Map displaying probable distribution of species. Points indicate recorded sightings from OBIS.
Favia favus.  Mainland Japan.  Large colonies are hemispherical or flattened.  Charlie Veron.

Favia favus. Mainland Japan. Large colonies are hemispherical or flattened. Charlie Veron.

Favia favus.  Indonesia.  Common variation in corallite shape and colour.  Charlie Veron.

Favia favus. Indonesia. Common variation in corallite shape and colour. Charlie Veron.

Favia favus.  Scott Reef, western Australia.  Common variation in corallite shape and colour.  Charlie Veron.

Favia favus. Scott Reef, western Australia. Common variation in corallite shape and colour. Charlie Veron.

Favia favus.  Indonesia.  Common variation in corallite shape and colour.  Neville Coleman.

Favia favus. Indonesia. Common variation in corallite shape and colour. Neville Coleman.

Favia favus.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallite detail.

Favia favus. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing corallite detail.

Favia favus.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallites.

Favia favus. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing corallites.

Favia favus.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallites.

Favia favus. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing corallites.

Favia favus.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallites.

Favia favus. Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Showing corallites.