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Euphyllia cristata

Chevalier, 1971

Colonies are phaceloid; corallites are closely compacted, 20-40 millimetres diameter. Small solitary polyps are common. Primary septa are very exsert and are conspicuous underwater. First and second order septa plunge steeply near the centre of the corallite. There are no columellae. Polyps have large tubular tentacles with knob-like tips.

Colour: Usually pale grey or green, with distinctively coloured tips to the tentacles.

Habitat: Shallow reef environments.

Abundance: Uncommon but conspicuous.

Similar species: Plerogyra sinuosa

Taxonomic note: Source reference: Veron (2000). Taxonomic references: Chevalier (1971), Veron and Pichon (1980). Additional identification guides: Veron (1986), Nishihira and Veron (1995).

Map displaying probable distribution of species. Points indicate recorded sightings from OBIS.
Euphyllia cristata.  Papua New Guinea.  Solitary polyp with tentacles partly retracted.  Valerie Taylor.

Euphyllia cristata.Papua New Guinea.Solitary polyp with tentacles partly retracted.Valerie Taylor.

Euphyllia cristata.  Papua New Guinea.  Solitary polyp with tentacles fully extended. The tall primary septa radiating like spokes of a wheel.  Neville Coleman.

Euphyllia cristata.Papua New Guinea.Solitary polyp with tentacles fully extended. The tall primary septa radiating like spokes of a wheel.Neville Coleman.

Euphyllia cristata.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallites.

Euphyllia cristata.Great Barrier Reef, Australia.Showing corallites.

Euphyllia cristata.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing costae.

Euphyllia cristata.Great Barrier Reef, Australia.Showing costae.

Euphyllia cristata.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing corallite detail.

Euphyllia cristata.Great Barrier Reef, Australia.Showing corallite detail.

Euphyllia cristata.  Great Barrier Reef, Australia.  Showing colony shape.

Euphyllia cristata.Great Barrier Reef, Australia.Showing colony shape.